Devils Punchbowl Falls

 

Devils Punchbowl Falls

One of the most impressive waterfalls in New Zealand, Devils Punchbowl Falls is located in the heart of Arthur's Pass National Park. Although the waterfall can be seen even from the highway, it's still better to walk up to the waterfall's base and enjoy its power. The waterfall is included into New Zealand Must See Waterfall's list.

Driving and walking conditions

GPS of the view point: S 42° 55' 58.749"  E 171° 34' 5.0844"
Parking: the end of Punchbowl Rd, Arthur's Pass
Vehicle type: All vehicle types Track type: Walking track
Road type: State HW Return track duration: 1hr 

Waterfall parameters

Waterfall height: 112m Type of the waterfall: Punchbowl

 

 


Walking and driving instructions

 

Devils Punchbowl Falls is roughly a 2-hours drive away from Christchurch or 1.5-hours from Greymouth. The road surface is always sealed.

If you drive from either Christchurch or Greymouth, take the SH-73 until you reach Arthur's Pass Village. You can leave your car either near the Information Center, or, what’s more recommended, turn onto Punchbowl Rd (signposted off the highway) where you find a huge car park with a couple of picnic tables and toilets.

A moderate 1-hour return Devils Punchbowl Waterfall Track climbs to the waterfall's base lookout. The first part of the track is relatively easy - you cross the Bealey River via a footbridge and walk through the forest. There will be one more bridge over the Devils Punchbowl Creek which offers an unforgettable view of the waterfall. From here be prepared to take a few never ending stairs! There are a couple of benches along the way to/from the waterfall where you may have a rest.

The waterfall is even more beautiful during a winter season when it's accompanied by snow peaks and, if you're lucky enough, the track could be covered by snow.

 


Waterfalls nearby (driving)

 

Attractions nearby

 

Arthur's Pass National Park is a park of contrasts, with dry beech/tawhai forest in the east, luxuriant rainforest on western slopes, and a historic highway and railway running through the middle. Arthur’s Pass was established in 1929 and was New Zealand’s third national park and the first one in the South Island.

 


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